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The hour we know not

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Sunday, November 12, 2017
32nd Sunday in Ordinary Time
1st Reading: Wisdom 6:12-16
2nd Reading: 1st Thessalonians 4:13-18
Gospel: Matthew 25:1-13

Jesus told this parable to his disciples, “This story throws light on what will happen in the kingdom of heaven. Ten bridesmaids went out with their lamps to meet the bridegroom. Five of them were careless while the others were sensible.

“The careless bridesmaids took their lamps as they were and did not bring extra oil. But those who were sensible, brought with their lamps flasks of oil. As the bridegroom delayed, they all grew drowsy and fell asleep.

“But at midnight, a cry rang out: ‘The bridegroom is here, come out and meet him!’ All the maidens woke up at once and trimmed their lamps. Then the careless ones said to the sensible ones: ‘Give us some oil, for our lamps are going out.’ The sensible ones answered: ‘There may not be enough for both you and us. You had better go to those who sell and buy for yourselves.’

“They were out buying oil when the bridegroom came, and those who were ready went with him to the wedding feast, and the doors were shut.

“Later the rest of the bridesmaids arrived and called out: ‘Lord, Lord, open to us.’ But he answered: ‘Truly, I do not know you.’

“So, stay awake, for you do not know the day nor the hour.”

D@iGITAL-EXPERIENCE
(Daily Gospel in the Assimilated Life Experience)

A story is told of a pilot who announced to the passengers that the two engines of the aircraft caught fire. Commotion ensued. Then an old lady proposed that they pray the novena to St. Rita, the saint of the impossible. Everyone did but still the aircraft continued losing altitude. Then they spotted a priest comfortably seated at the rear as if nothing was happening. They approached him to asked what kind of novena they should recite. The priest said, “Repeat after me. O my God, I am heartily sorry for having offended you and I detest all my sins…” (Bro. Andrew Maria, Vestiges of Wisdom).

There are situations where only a miracle can stop death from snatching life away. But to what avail is saving life from the jaws of death if it will again be spent in wanton disregard of the Will of its Creator? The better miracle to ask for is the miracle of repentance.
At times it takes a miracle to boot one out from the structures of sin. People only think about repentance when death begins to scare them. The bad news is that when death comes, the person becomes so weak and is no longer disposed to repent.
Life is a journey; call it a flight to heaven where engines can conk out anytime. If one should need a miracle to repent, he must pray for it now that there is still time. — (Atty.) Rev. Fr. Dan Domingo P. delos Angeles, Jr., D.M. Email: dan.delosangeles@gmail.com.

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