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Taipei Universiade

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IN the last three editions of the biennial Summer Universiade, also known as the World University Games, the host country had topped the overall medal standings (based on gold production).

Not this year, though. In the 29th renewal of the Summer Universiade in New Taipei City, Chinese-Taipei last month, Japan emerged No. 1 among the 66 countries that registered a podium finish (gold/silver/bronze) in the field of 145 nations plus host Chinese-Taipei.

The Japanese, who wound up fourth in the medal charts during the 2015 competitions in Gwangju, Republic of Korea (South) behind the host country, Russian Federation and People’s Republic of China romped away with 37 golds, 27 silvers and 36 bronzes for a 101 total.

South Korea, the medal topnotcher two years ago, ranked second this time at 30-22-30 (82). Chinese-Taipei placed third at 26-34-30 (90), followed by Russia, 25-31-38 (94); and the United States, 16-19-16 (51).

Rounding out the top 10 were 6-Ukraine (12-11-13=36), 7-North Korea (12-5-6=23), 8-Italy (9-6-17=32), 9-China (9-6-2=17), and 10-Islamic Republic of Iran (8-4-11=23).

The Philippines officially ranked 53rd to 59th places with a silver medal in men’s wushu (sanda 52-kilogram event) through University of Baguio’s Jomar Balangui.

The country was expected to do well in men’s golf, but our three-member team finished in the lower half of the individual competitions participated in by 69 golfers from 33 countries at the Sunrise Golf and Country Club in Taoyuan City.

The event in the par-72 course was reduced to three rounds due to heavy rains.

Ateneo de Manila University’s Jay Matthew Reyes came up with the Filipinos’ best three-day score at 224, which tied him for 40th-41st places.

Jonas Christian Magcalayo of Mapua University and Ivan Monsalve of California Baptist University in the United States, each had a score of 225, ranking them 42nd and 43rd overall.

The gold medal in the men’s individual event was won by Mexico’s Raul Pereda de la Huerta, who was at 16-under for a 200 tally. He edged out Japan’s Kazuki Higa, who was at 14-under for 202 and settled for the silver.

The Philippines finished 13th in the three-man team competitions with an aggregate score of 674. Our golfers finished ahead of 16-United States and 17-Russian Federation.

Japan topped the event among the 21-team cast at 406. Mexico grabbed the silver at 409. Chinese-Taipei collected the bronze at 414.

More on the 2017 Taipei Universiade where the United States lost both its men’s and women’s basketball crown.

The Americans were represented by the Purdue Boilermakers in men’s basketball and lost to Lithuania, 85-74, in the gold-medal encounter for their lone setback in eight appearances.

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